Boosting Mental And Emotional Health After Age 60

Boosting Mental And Emotional Health After Age 60

This article will discuss 8 ways to increase social interaction after age 60 to help boost mental and emotional health.

A report in 2012 gave some insight into the effects of social isolation on seniors.

boostingmentalandemotionalhealth

   Boosting Mental and Emotional Health

 

According to the author, “social isolation is a major and prevalent health problem among community-dwelling older adults, leading to numerous detrimental health conditions … social isolation will impact the health, well-being, and quality of life of numerous older adults.”

Not only does social isolation have a damaging effect on life expectancy, it also affects our mental health too. Loneliness has been found to increase our risk of depression, social anxiety, addiction, as well as hoarding.

Older people who live in increasingly smaller worlds are particularly at risk of loneliness and therefore diminished mental and emotional health, which is why it is  important that a way is found to increase social interaction.

The following are 8 ways  to boost your mental and emotional health after age 60:

1. Invite Friends For Tea or Coffee

As we get past 60, it’s all too easy to assume that people don’t want us to bother them by inviting them around for tea, coffee, and cake. They’re growing old themselves and they have their own lives to worry about.

You’d be surprised at how much family, friends or even neighbors appreciate being invited round for a chat and some tea and coffee.

2. Go Back To School

Yes, back to school! At numerous colleges and universities, mature students represent around one quarter of the student body. It doesn’t matter how old you are because no one is ever too old to learn.

Taking classes online or on campus to get a degree  or just because you are interested will challenge you, boost your confidence and help you learn new skills.

3. Learn How To Use A Computer

We now live in the age of information, which basically means that computers have taken over young peoples’ lives. The problem for anyone over 60 is that you may have missed the boat and assumed that computers are simply tools for the younger generation.

However, a computer, no matter how daunting it might appear at first, is an incredibly useful social tool that connects you to the outer world. You can get in touch with old friends or even find new friends.

You can join online forums and groups and even go to conventions you never knew existed. It’s a fabulous way of staying in touch with people and opens up your world.

Moreover, your mental health can get a boost too if you try your hand at online games, such as chess.

4. Buy A Phone

You can increase your social interaction by purchasing a cellular phone. Most phone companies now offer monthly contracts, so you can pretty much talk to people on the phone for as long as you want. You can text message too, and even play games on it. Having a cell phone ensures that you will not miss any invitations for a social event.

5. Involve Yourself In Community Activities

Most towns have community centers that hold regular community activities for older people. These activities generally include singing, book clubs, bridge clubs, quiz nights, as well as bingo nights, and yoga groups.

Involving yourself in community activities helps to stimulate your mind and your emotional health and meeting new people is one of the most important action steps to boost your health and wellbeing.

6. Help Others

You’re never too old to learn, and you’re never too old to help others. If you have knowledge and experience that you’ve always wanted to share with other people, now is the time to do it.

Whether you decide to mentor a younger person or help out at a homeless shelter, your mental skills will certainly be tested and sharpened – no matter how rusty they were!

7. Plan Ahead

Sometimes we’re a little bit guilty of not getting much done during the week because we simply haven’t planned anything. We wake up in the morning not knowing what we’re going to do, and so we just drift through the day.

If you buy yourself a calendar and make plans for the week, you’re more likely to stick to them. Moreover, you’ll become more adventurous in your planning and may even consider doing something you’ve never done before.

8. Plan It!

Plan a month of activities that will you engage in. Get creative and write them down in your calendar or date book.

Get creative and choose fun and exciting new adventures, and ask friends to come along. Do this at the beginning of each month and stick to them as you would all those business appointments you used to keep.

How Anyone Can Benefit From Life Management For Physicians

We all can benefit from a dose of life management from time to time; however, when it comes to life management for physicians we tend to think they have it all together.

There is not a single occupation that does not have demands, stressors as well as rewards.

Perhaps physicians just stand out because they are who we turn to for optimal health and during times of crisis.

Afterall, if your doctor is able to see all those patients and show up at 2 o’clock in the morning at your hospital bedside he must have his act together, right?

Hmm…maybe not

A doctors life expectancy many years ago was only about 55, due to the demands of burning the candle at both ends, personal habits, and ignoring their own health issues.

Fast forward to 2011 and we see doctors living much longer; however, the burnout rate has escalated in certain specialties, especially primary care.

The changes you may be witnessing are doctors that once took care of you in the office and hospital are now making a choice to do one or the other. There are many reasons why they make the decision to do one or the other, but the primary response you will hear is needing more time for themselves, friends, family and the one they love.

It is no secret that the medical profession does not have a great track record when it comes to achieving success with long term relationships.

If a physician is leaving home at 6 a.m. and getting home at 10 p.m., something is going to eventually give even in the most committed of relationships.

Does this mean your doctor that has provided your care for many years suddenly doesn’t care about you?

Of course not, they are finally realizing that to provide optimal health care, they need to be taking better care of themselves as well.

Working up to eighteen hours per day does not leave anyone much time to focus on themselves.

To achieve health excellence we all need to address the spiritual , emotional , and physical aspects as our health care needs. We all know that being out of align in one aspect can wreck havoc on our overall health.

Doctors are required to be constantly learning new things, dealing with lower reimbursement, complying with documentation rules, seeing more patients, less income, phone calls, dictation, malpractice threats and many other issues all before they even consider the time their family wants and deserves.

I know, that is what they signed up for when they went to medical school, so they should just deal with it.

I am sure you have noticed that your doctor seems to spend less time with you year after year…the days of sitting down and chatting about your latest vacation or how the family is doing are about over. To maintain their incomes and expectations of the people that sign their paychecks, doctors are being pushed to see patients as often as every 10 minutes.

Now that is great if you are the patient that wants to get back to work and just has a cold or sore throat, but what about the older patient taking 10-15 medications for heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure. That visit will take a minimum of 20 minutes if no one talks.

So, I hope you can see the frustration many physicians face in the constantly changing world of health care.

Many would argue that physicians need to get better at managing their time.

How do you manage your time when their is no more time to manage.

Or is there?

Life management through time management for physicians is something we can all learn and benefit from.

If you are a doctor or someone dealing with the difficulties of any other profession, then the following strategies may help you achieve a more rewarding life in and out of the office.

1. Just Listen- instead of keeping your eye on the clock, take the time to allow your patient or customer to just talk about their problems, family and what makes them smile. Even if you only do this a couple times a day you will feel more rewarded for your efforts at the end of the day and your patient or customer will think you spent hours with them.

2. Emotional competence- look for emotional competence and professional competence when dealing with people and potential employees. Someone that knows what makes them happy, what upsets them, what they find satisfying, can be a great future asset to your business.

3. What Bugs You- take the time at the end of the day to make a list of the things that are bothering you  before leaving the office.

4. Ask For Advice- ask your older patient or customer how they dealt with certain issues in the past. Their insight can be invaluable and many have a wealth of wisdom.

5. Stop Trying To Be All Things To All People- sometimes you just have to  say, no,  or I can not do this today.

6. Take Time Off- take regularly scheduled days off or half a day.  Your patients and your staff
will eventually expect you to be off and unavailable during that time. Use the time for something you really want to do.

7.Become More Transparent– share with your patients, colleagues, and customers  your struggle to find balance in your
life. They will most likely have some useful and uplifting advice.

8.Family Needs- ask your family what they need most from you. It may be something
different than you think. (Ask your office staff too.)

9. Spread Your Wings– when you’re out socially with colleagues and friends, make a real attempt to
talk about things other than medicine or business. There is a whole big world out there unrelated to the health care profession.

10. Balance Your Task- learn when to multitask and when to hyper focus  on things that need your attention now.

11. Eat With Your Family- eat at least one meal a day with your family or with a friend. You will be perceived as having spent more time with them if you sit down and give them your full attention. Patients perceive the time spent with the doctor as much longer when the doctor actually sat down and listened.

12. Your Own Mental Health Team- develop a support system that helps you relieve  or eliminate stress. Everyone needs family and friends to
rely on, but baby-sitters, house cleaners and someone to take care of the lawn can play a major role in keeping your stress under control.

13. Avoid The Office On Days Off- try to avoid getting into the habit of  going into the office on the weekend or other days off, unless absolutely necessary.
It is rare you get caught up or stay caught up when you use the weekend instead of spending the time doing other things with family or using it for “me” time.

14. Keep Business Separate From Friendships- make friends with a few people who will agree to never ask you to be their doctor.

15. Learn To Shift- remember that life balance is a shifting concept and some days will be better than others.

16. Talk To Yourself- ask yourself a simple question, “Is doing ________ going to make me wish I was home with my family?” If so, graciously say, “No thanks, someone else will have to do it.”

17. Enjoy The Journey- realize that each one of us has our own mountain to climb. Try to remember to pause to enjoy the view along the way and to help and let yourself be helped by others you meet on the path.

Try to implement at least one of the above strategies into your business and life.

Learning how to tweak this and shift there will help create greater satisfaction and less stress leading to am more rewarding  practice, happier relationships and more  optimal health.

 

Docmac